Peer-Reviewed Journal Details
Mandatory Fields
Dunne, S;Coffey, L;Gallagher, P;Desmond, D;Ryall, N
2015
June
Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine
BEYOND FUNCTION: USING ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGIES FOLLOWING LOWER LIMB LOSS
Published
13 ()
Optional Fields
GOAL ADJUSTMENT PHENOMENOLOGICAL APPROACH WALKING ABILITY AMPUTATION LIFE REHABILITATION PROSTHESIS EMBODIMENT EXPERIENCE VETERANS
47
561
568
Objective: To explore how individuals experience and perceive the use of assistive technologies following lower limb loss. Design: Cross-sectional qualitative interview design. Patients: Thirty individuals with lower limb amputation were recruited from a multi-disciplinary rehabilitation programme (26 males and 4 females); comprising individuals with above-knee (n=16), below-knee (n=12) and bilateral (n=2) amputations. Patients were at least 15 months post-rehabilitation, at least 18 years old and spoke English. Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted via telephone or in person. Interview data were inductively thematically analysed by a researcher who had no previous contact with participants. Results: Three key themes were identified: "It didn't feel part of me" - Heightened awareness and experiences of distance from prostheses following lower limb loss; "Depending on others is really tough" - Independence through assistive technologies; and "I feel confident with this leg" - The value of prosthesis use following amputation. Conclusion: The findings demonstrate that individuals with lower limb loss perceive and experience assistive technologies to have uses in ways beyond their potential for functional restoration. They may also attribute meanings and values relating to such technologies that may influence their use. Ascertaining and being aware of individuals' experiences and perceptions of assistive technologies is important for lower limb loss rehabilitation.
UPPSALA
1650-1977
10.2340/16501977-1962
Grant Details