Peer-Reviewed Journal Details
Mandatory Fields
MacLachlan, M.
1996
June
J R Soc Health
Identifying problems in community health promotion: an illustration of the Nominal Group Technique in AIDS education
Published
()
Optional Fields
Adult Female Focus Groups/*methods HIV Infections/*prevention & control Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice *Health Promotion Health Services Research/*methods Humans Malawi Male *Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome--prevention and control Africa Africa South Of The Sahara *Beliefs Communication Culture Data Collection Developing Countries Diseases Eastern Africa Economic Factors Education English Speaking Africa *Focus Groups *Health Education *Hiv Infections--prevention and control Marketing *Misinformation *Promotion Research Methodology *Summary Report Viral Diseases
116
3
143
8
Recognition of the extent and consequences of HIV/AIDS in Africa has resulted in many large scale health promotion programmes. These programmes usually provide information about how to avoid contracting HIV as well as information to dispel false beliefs about the virus. However there also exist anti-health promotion ideas about HIV/AIDS which often challenge the very premises on which health promotion messages are based. Such anti-health promotion ideas may represent reassuring benefits and these are likely to vary not only across cultures but also between different communities and 'at risk' groups within the same culture. The Nominal Group Technique (NGT) is a participative exercise which can be used with small groups to achieve a consensus concerning which anti-health promotion ideas are most influential in terms of encouraging people to ignore health promoting messages. The application of the NGT is illustrated with a group of Malawian students. There are anti-health promotion ideas about HIV/AIDS which often challenge the premises upon which health promotion messages are based. The Nominal Group Technique (NGT) is a participative exercise which can be used with small groups to achieve a consensus on which anti-health promotion ideas are most influential in encouraging people to ignore health promotion messages. The application of the NGT is illustrated with a group of 10 fourth-year university Malawian psychology students, four females and six males. They were asked which ideas they had heard about HIV/AIDS which may encourage people to ignore health promotion efforts to prevent the spread of HIV/AIDS. The processes of idea generation, idea selection, listing, clarification, ranking, and consensus-building are described. The following ideas were produced in decreasing order of importance as encouraging people to ignore health promotion efforts to prevent the spread of HIV/AIDS: there is nothing you can do about AIDS, some witch doctors can cure AIDS, AIDS is just another epidemic, enjoy life because you will die anyway, AIDS simply stands for an "American Idea to Discourage Sex," AIDS is a disease only for Whites, AIDS has always existed, car accidents cause more deaths than AIDS, AIDS does not exist, AIDS is a fashionable name for all diseases, AIDS is a mandate for moral behavior, blood group "O" cannot contract AIDS, people are able to cope with HIV, and AIDS is a way of controlling the population. The advantages and disadvantages of the NGT in primary prevention are discussed. eng
0264-0325 (Print) 0264-03
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8691395
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