Peer-Reviewed Journal Details
Mandatory Fields
Aherne CM;Saeedi B;Collins CB;Masterson JC;McNamee EN;Perrenoud L;Rapp CR;Curtis VF;Bayless A;Fletcher A;Glover LE;Evans CM;Jedlicka P;Furuta GT;de Zoeten EF;Colgan SP;Eltzschig HK;
2015
November
Mucosal Immunology
Epithelial-specific A2B adenosine receptor signaling protects the colonic epithelial barrier during acute colitis.
Published
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Optional Fields
8
6
Central to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) pathogenesis is loss of mucosal barrier function. Emerging evidence implicates extracellular adenosine signaling in attenuating mucosal inflammation. We hypothesized that adenosine-mediated protection from intestinal barrier dysfunction involves tissue-specific signaling through the A2B adenosine receptor (Adora2b) at the intestinal mucosal surface. To address this hypothesis, we combined pharmacologic studies and studies in mice with global or tissue-specific deletion of the Adora2b receptor. Adora2b(-/-) mice experienced a significantly heightened severity of colitis, associated with a more acute onset of disease and loss of intestinal epithelial barrier function. Comparison of mice with Adora2b deletion on vascular endothelial cells (Adora2b(fl/fl)VeCadCre(+)) or intestinal epithelia (Adora2b(fl/fl)VillinCre(+)) revealed a selective role for epithelial Adora2b signaling in attenuating colonic inflammation. In vitro studies with Adora2b knockdown in intestinal epithelial cultures or pharmacologic studies highlighted Adora2b-driven phosphorylation of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) as a specific barrier repair response. Similarly, in vivo studies in genetic mouse models or treatment studies with an Adora2b agonist (BAY 60-6583) recapitulate these findings. Taken together, our results suggest that intestinal epithelial Adora2b signaling provides protection during intestinal inflammation via enhancing mucosal barrier responses.
1935-3456
10.1038/mi.2015.22
Grant Details