Peer-Reviewed Journal Details
Mandatory Fields
Coughlan, M;Toth, Z;Van Landeghem, KJJ;Mccarron, S;Wheeler, AJ
2020
October
JOURNAL OF QUATERNARY SCIENCE
Formational history of the Wicklow Trough: a marine-transgressed tunnel valley revealing ice flow velocity and retreat rates for the largest ice stream draining the late-Devensian British-Irish Ice Sheet
Published
1 ()
Optional Fields
GLACIAL ISOSTATIC-ADJUSTMENT SUBGLACIAL BED CONDITIONS SOUTHERN NORTH-SEA CELTIC SEA PLEISTOCENE MORPHOLOGY DYNAMICS MODEL OSCILLATIONS DEGLACIATION
35
7
907
919
The Wicklow Trough is one of several Irish Sea bathymetric deeps, yet unusually isolated from the main depression, the Western Trough. Its formation has been described as proglacial or subglacial, linked to the Irish Sea Ice Stream (ISIS) during the Last Glacial Maximum. The evolution of the Wicklow Trough and neighbouring deeps, therefore, help us to understand ISIS dynamics, when it was the main ice stream draining the former British-Irish Ice Sheet. The morphology and sub-seabed stratigraphy of the 18 km long and 2 km wide Wicklow Trough is described here from new multibeam echosounder data, 60 km of sparker seismic profiles and five sediment cores. At a maximum water depth of 82 m, the deep consists of four overdeepened sections. The heterogeneous glacial sediments in the Trough overlay bedrock, with indications of flank mass-wasting and subglacial bedforms on its floor. The evidence strongly suggests that the Wicklow Trough is a tunnel valley formed by time-transgressive erosional processes, with pressurised meltwater as the dominant agent during gradual or slow ice sheet retreat. Its location may be fault-controlled, and the northern end of the Wicklow Trough could mark a transition from rapid to slow grounded ice margin retreat, which could be tested with modelling.
HOBOKEN
0267-8179
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/jqs.3234
10.1002/jqs.3234
Grant Details