Peer-Reviewed Journal Details
Mandatory Fields
McNicholl, A;Desmond, D;Gallagher, P
2020
November
Disability and rehabilitation. Assistive technology
Assistive technologies, educational engagement and psychosocial outcomes among students with disabilities in higher education
Published
1 ()
Optional Fields
COLLEGE-STUDENTS POSTSECONDARY STUDENTS IMPACT EXPERIENCES PREDICTORS WHEELCHAIR LEARNERS LANGUAGE DEVICES ILLNESS
PurposeIncreasing numbers of students with disabilities are accessing higher education each year, yet little is known about their assistive technology (AT) needs and its influence on relevant outcomes. The aim of this study was to examine met/unmet AT needs on educational engagement, academic self-efficacy and well-being and the impact of AT use in the areas of competence, adaptability and self-esteem for students with disabilities in higher education in Ireland.MethodsOne hundred and eleven students with disabilities completed a cross-sectional online survey comprising the College Learning Effectiveness Inventory, the Student Course Engagement Questionnaire, the Self-Efficacy for Learning Form Abridged, the Psychosocial Impact of Assistive Devices Scale, and the Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-Being Scale.ResultsAT use was found to have a positive psychosocial impact in the areas of competence, adaptability and self-esteem. Those whose AT needs were fully met scored significantly higher on academic self-efficacy, well-being, and on 4 of the 10 educational engagement subscales compared to those who had unmet AT needs. Met/unmet AT needs were not predictive of educational engagement.ConclusionThese findings highlight the importance of AT from both educational engagement and psychosocial perspectives for students with a wide variety of disability diagnoses. The wide-reaching benefits of AT must be considered by governmental departments when making funding allocations to disability services within higher education institutions.
PHILADELPHIA
1748-3107
10.1080/17483107.2020.1854874
Grant Details